The Pygmy Possum Has Resurfaced After It’s Species Was Thought To Be Extinct

The mountain pygmy possum is so uncommon that it was only known from fossils until skiers discovered one scampering across a woodpile from its shelter on Mount Hotham in Victoria, Australia, in 1966.

While it was thought that owing to recent huge fires in Australia, this little species may have been almost wiped off the face of the Earth, we now have excellent news for our beloved Animal Kingdom.

Mother Nature bestowed one of the year’s most delightful gifts on us.

This is the finding of a little pygmy possum that had not been seen since the tragic day when fire and flames destroyed Australia.

The news is encouraging for our ecology; it is a ray of sunshine following the gloom caused by the calamity.

Kangaroo Island Land for Wildlife, a group of volunteers devoted to environmental conservation, discovered the adorable critters.

A pleasant result of the tremendous efforts undertaken to repair the ecosystem that was destroyed by the wildfires.

There have only been 113 documented recordings of pygmy possums in the region, according to Pat Hodgens, a wildlife scientist in the area.

“It’s clearly not a common species, and obviously, the summer wildfires burnt most of the habitat that the species had previously.”

But, in reality, we were hoping to find them,” Hodgens told reporters.

This is said to be the tiniest possum species on the globe, making them nearly undetectable and extremely difficult to discover and research.

These are the first specimens discovered on Kangaroo Island after it was destroyed.

“We are undertaking comprehensive investigations to determine which species still exist in order to do all possible to conserve them and ensure their survival during this critical moment,” Hodgens added.

It is critical to regulate and monitor the situation thoroughly, as we may be in the presence of the final refuge for many of these species, which rely on extremely ancient vegetation that is fighting to emerge from the ashes, according to specialists.

In addition to these wonderful small pygmy creatures, more than 20 distinct kinds of fauna, including a Tammar wallaby and a South Australian brown bandicoot, have been identified.

Australia went through hell throughout the summer months of 2019. Fires ravaged 186,000 square kilometers of land across the country, killing 34 people and affecting millions more animals.

A year later, it is felt that forgetting the disaster is harmful. Large swaths of green and affluent regions look sterile to us, shifting from green to gray.

Aside from the distressing material, the present scene can help authorities give crucial information on the effects of the fires and vegetation levels, as well as damage to property and animals.

All creatures ought to be safeguarded, safe in their native habitat, which is frequently destroyed. In some circumstances, this is due to force majeure, in which natural calamities ruin the environments in which they cohabit, while in others, it is owing to man’s ignorance.